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Protect Your Pets from Fleas and Ticks

December 2, 2016


tick embedded in skin

Are you a pet owner? Do you want to keep your pet safe?  Let Nozzle Nolen help!

Fleas and ticks can pose a serious threat to your beloved pets but don’t worry because there are many different treatments out there that will work to protect them. When deciding how to keep your pets safe from fleas and ticks, it can be helpful to know about the many different options available, so I decided to make things a little easier for you with an outline of the various types of treatments and how they work. We can break it down into three overall categories that every product falls under Topical Medication, Oral Treatment, and Dog Collars.Keep in mind that for

Keep in mind that for a complete protection, pet owners should use a combination of the following products. Everyone has a different living situation, and each pet’s physiology and environment will require different types of preventative measures, so it is best to consulate a veterinarian for advice on which products you should use together and why. 

Topical Medications

Topical medications can be very effective at getting rid of existing infestations as well as preventing future ones. They work by applying the medicine directly to the skin. They come in the form of spot-on treatments, sprays, or shampoos.

Spot-on Treatments

Spot-on treatments are the most popular kind of flea treatment simply because they work so very well.  Most should be applied every month to ensure protection. They are generally inexpensive with very few side effects and easy applications. However, these products vary in how they should be applied to the skin so be sure to read the label.  In addition, make sure to double-check which animals the products are safe to use on. Many products are safe for dogs but dangerous for cats and Vis Versa.  Examples of popular spot-on treatments are Frontline Plus and K9 Advantix.

Flea and Tick Sprays

The spray products are fast-acting flea and tick killers. Plus they provide residual protection for your pet. They work best when used in-between baths because they can be rubbed or washed off. Check the labels to find out how to safely apply them. For some, it is a good idea to lightly spray on if you plan to take your pet to any high-risk areas, such as forests or fields with tall grass. On the other hand, sprays may be toxic to other animals, so be careful not to expose any of your other pets.

Flea and Tick Shampoos

Flea and tick shampoos are usually designed to kill pests on contact and they do a good job at that. Unfortunately, the shampoos typically only last one day, with no residual properties, so most vets will recommend that you pair them with flea pills for the best results. The shampoos are used like any other bath product, with the exception that they may direct you to leave it in for a few minutes before rinsing. Since they are not long lasting, you may need to repeat the process a couple of times to get rid of an infestation completely.

Oral Treatments

Oral treatments can be just as effective as topical medications, and some prefer them because they ensure protection for your pet’s entire body whereas there is a possibility of ‘missing a spot’ with the topical options. Again, it is imperative to read the label for the safety of your pet. In general, oral treatments are most effective when used along with other kinds of products; pet owners should consult their veterinarian about putting together a combination of products to protect their pets.

Flea and Tick PillsThe flea and tick pills guarantee the most success for complete protection, but they usually have specific functions such as to be used on dogs only or cats only, to protect specifically against ticks or specifically against fleas, to kill the pest or to repel it, to target the adult pest or their eggs, etc.  In addition, most oral medications require a script from a veterinarian. Each pill will do one specific function, so

The flea and tick pills guarantee the most success for complete protection, but they usually have specific functions such as to be used on dogs only or cats only, to protect specifically against ticks or specifically against fleas, to kill the pest or to repel it, to target the adult pest or their eggs, etc. In addition, most oral medications require a script from a veterinarian. Each pill will do one specific function, so usually, your veterinarian will recommend multiple pills in order to properly protect your pet. 

Flea and Tick Dog Collars

Dog collars work well to prevent parasites, but they are made for dogs so consult a veterinarian before using them on cats or other pets. Most dog collars are coated with chemicals meant to repel fleas and ticks, and they need to touch the skin in order to transfer those chemicals to your dog. This option is considered economical because it is long-lasting: most flea and tick dog collars last for about eight months before needing to be replaced. When purchasing one of these collars, look for “kill” on the label if you want to get rid of an infestation. They are great to prevent ticks since they mostly protect the area around your pet’s neck and face which is where ticks prefer to bite dogs and cats. They can be especially useful when trying to get rid of an existing infestation because they will prevent new outbreaks.  An example of a popular flea and tick collar is the Seresto brand.

If you have any questions about flea and tick protection for pets or if you are interested in our pest control services, please call one of our Nozzle Nolen representatives at (888) 685-0376.

Sources

Beall, Melissa, PhD. "Protecting Your Dog from Fleas and Ticks." Pet Health Network. IDEXX Laboratories, Inc, 11 Mar. 2015. Web. <http://www.pethealthnetwork.com/dog-health/dog-checkups-preventive-care/protecting-your-dog-fleas-and-ticks>.

Carey, Gina. "Compare The 3 Types Of Flea And Tick Medication For Dogs." PetCareRx. PetCareRx, 08 May 2014. Web. <https://www.petcarerx.com/article/compare-the-3-types-of-flea-and-tick-medication-for-dogs/2790>.

"Controlling Fleas and Ticks on Your Pets." The Humane Society of the United States. HSUS, 2016. Web. <http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/controlling_flea_ticks_pets.html>.

Donatelli., James, and Sara Stout. "Flea and Tick Prevention and Treatment Options." PetCareRx. Pet Care Rx, 26 Jan. 2011. Web. <https://www.petcarerx.com/article/flea-and-tick-prevention-and-treatment-options/94>.

Kvamme, Jennifer. "The 10 Best Ways to Get Rid of & Prevent Ticks on Dogs." PetMD. PetMD, LLC., 2016. Web. <http://www.petmd.com/dog/parasites/evr_dg_10_ways_to_stop_ticks_from_biting_your_dog>.

Sloan, Carrie. "How to Get a Tick Out of a Dog: Common Myths and Foolproof Methods." Vetstreet. Vetstreet, 13 May 2014. Web. <http://www.vetstreet.com/our-pet-experts/how-to-properly-remove-ticks-common-myths-and-foolproof-methods>.

"Types of Flea Control for Dogs - 1800PetMeds®." PetMeds® Pet Education. PetMed Express, Inc, 2016. Web. <http://www.1800petmeds.com/education/types-flea-control-dogs-7.htm>.

"Where Do Ticks Commonly Hide on Your Body?" Reference. Reference An IAC Publishing Labs Company, 2016. Web. <https://www.reference.com/health/ticks-commonly-hide-body-f7db8a1644bbc035>.




 

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